All manner of physical and virtual assets exist around us, and are ripe for being repurposed to serve new ends.



Many years ago I once read a magazine article about some children living in a very poor village. They didn’t have the luxurious plush-toys or the sophisticated talking birds that we had in the West. What they did have was old metal coat-hangers. So they would bend and mould the coathangers into various new shapes and designs, for example, a toy car.

This got me thinking about how many items in our everyday life can be repurposed – altered a drastically (or just slightly) to serve a different purpose than what they were originally intended for.

You could take a television that you watch passively, attach a processor of some kind (say, an Atari), and attach an input device (say, a joystick) and, all of a sudden, it has become an interactive gaming experience.

Repurposing can also occur in the intangible, “digital” space. You can dig into your email history, find something that was sent by a colleague or coworker or friend or someone else you know, and that message, which was meant for one purpose, could be re-purposed to serve a totally new purpose. There’s nothing stopping you from taking that entire email, perhaps tweaking a few words in the body and changing the subject line, and sending it to someone else, for a totally new purpose.

We have incredibly sophistocated tools now, enabling us to repurpose practically any kind of digital asset. We can use graphics editors to manipulate bitmap images, vector graphics editors to manipulate drawings, video editors to manipulate video, specialised content editing tools to manipulate pieces of text, all the way through to sophistocated algorithmic modelling tools that can manipulate mathematical matrices.

Repurposing is much easier with digital items, and we can think of the assets we own and/or have access to (e.g. email, chat and text histories, social media profiles, documents, audio/video footage, online resources, even physical items such as advertising/marketing you see in the space around you) as fields and fields of space, containing potential gold or diamonds buried underneath.

If you happen to encounter some asset or artifact that serves its purpose very well in one context, consider how you might repurpose it to serve well in a totally different context.


The ideas presented in this article draw some inspiration from Silicon Valley, such as the history of Slack as recounted by Steward Butterfield.


Life doesn’t always go to plan. How might we think about plans in a way that keeps us motivated and moving forward?


Have you ever had one of those “face-palm” moments in life, where it suddenly hit you that you had made a less-than-optimal decision? If you had known more, you might have made a different decision, or no decision at all!

The frustrating thing is, now you do know! Now you can see that X and Y are necessary, in order to achieve Z. But at the time you made the decision, you weren’t aware of this.

The problem is, at the time, you didn’t have the information or awareness to know what the problem with your decision was going to be, whereas now you do know. And I think this reveals something about how work gets done and things get achieved in time, which is: not everything happens in the order that we think it will happen.

We may have a model of the world in our minds, which is sequential and tied to certain dates and times, kind of like a flowchart. For example:


A leads to B leads to C and D, D leads to E and F, and E and F lead to G.

The way things actually work out, often is quite different. For example:


A leads to B. B seems like it will lead to C, but actually ends up leading all the way to Z. And it’s only when we get to Z that we then see the whole alphabet, and that the process involves all 26 letters, not just the 6 or 7 we started out with!

We can’t really change the fact that reality often doesn’t go to plan. However, we can offer ourselves some mental consolation and self-forgivenness.

We can remember how much we didn’t know at the time. Give that memory space. And give ourselves “permission in retrospect” to have not known everything. “I didn’t know, we didn’t know”. And because that time has already passed, we can’t go back in a time-machine and make it any different (at least, not until Elon Musk gets round to time-travel!)

So, in a sense, there wasn’t necessarily ever a problem. The project did go “according to plan”, but it was just a different plan than we had originally understood! Perhaps a larger plan, perhaps smaller. But it is a plan, and there is a structure to it. We simply need to maintain our awareness of the change, adapt to it and move with it.

As you go through this kind of change many times, over the course of a career, you develop mental processes and tools for working in this way. Rather than our plans becoming like a large structure, say a tower made of stones, which can’t bend or move, our plans become more like a ship, which can be steered in one direction, then steered in another, moored and unmoored, or taken to a warehouse, dis-assembled and re-assembled.

So a change in plan isn’t a catastrophe. It’s valuable information that we can use to steer the “ship” of our work and make new discoveries along the way!