Forces

Combining multiple small forces, all pushing you in a similar direction, you can move closer to your goals with less effort.

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Audio

Imagine a big, long-term goal you might have. Perhaps it’s to lose weight. Perhaps it’s to save up enough money to retire, or at least, to live more comfortably.

It’s the kind of goal that won’t happen overnight, and won’t happen without significant effort and perspiration (and perhaps risk).

You may find it very difficult to see that goal through to the end. There may be multiple factors over time that make it difficult. There are things that make it constantly difficult to achieve your goal.

For example, you’re trying to eat less in order to lose weight, but, almost constantly, occasions or situations seem to arise that make that goal difficult. For example, it’s late at night, you find yourself starving, and you find it hard to resist going to the freezer and reaching for the frozen pizza.

Or you’re trying to save money, but situations seem to keep arising that cause you to have to spend money.

A strategy I’ve found helpful is to try to position myself so that I have multiple forces pushing me toward my goal, rather than pulling me away from it.

Imagine a beach-ball on the pavement, which you’re trying to move without directly pushing it. You try blowing at it. But it’s a windy day and your breath is no competition for the winds blowing in multiple directions, perhaps even in your direction.

But now imagine if you and 3 friends stood in front of the ball, all of you holding leaf blowers. Each of you standing at a slightly different angle, but all aiming the ball in a generally common direction. That ball would be much more likely to go where you want it to!

And it can be the same with long-term goals and forces that push you one way or another in life.

Going back to the example of losing weight, if you rely only on your will power and, say, a diet plan, you may be on course for a while, but then veer off, due to other complex forces getting in the way.

But you could combine your will power and diet with multiple other forces. For example:

  • You could move house to a place that’s very close to a gym. Now that the gym in a few minutes’ walk away, rather than a 30 minute commute, it’s more likely that you’ll go there regularly.
  • You could make less food available to you at any given time. You even buy a smaller fridge, which can fit less food in it, so that instead of a few footsteps away, the food is a walk-to-the-shops away. Or you might put your food on a high shelf. Or try to spend less time at home, so that you’re not tempted.
  • You could get into a habit of preparing/cooking low-calorie, highly filling foods. This might mean learning cooking methods that are simple and fast. That way, you’re more motivated to, say, quick-steam some broccoli, rather than put a pizza in the microwave oven. (At least one person I know has gotten rid of their microwave altogether!)
  • You could attend some kind of support group or meetup of dieters, where you motivate eachother and give eachother tips. So the influence of that group pushes you in the direction of weight-loss.

Or take money as another example:

  • You could move to an area where rents are cheaper, so you’re paying less for housing.
  • You could also choose, among the cheaper places to live, an area that’s farther away from expensive shops, e.g. clothing stores or tech stores, so that there’s less temptation to spend money on these kinds of items.
  • You could let your friends know about your goals, and have them encourage and support those goals, perhaps even hold you to account for them!
  • You could visualise your goal – perhaps make a drawing about it and put that on your wall so you see it regularly, or set your morning “wake-up” alarm to some piece of audio that reminds you of your goal, say, a song or an excerpt from a speech.

If you have your life set up so that there are many forces pushing you where you want to go, then it’s more likely that you’ll get there by sheer inertia, even while your will-power and resolve goes through ups and downs.

These techniques can also be applied within the workforce, whether you’re a business owner, manager, employee, consultant, etc. For example, if you want to develop a new skill or competency, you could might try:

  • Regularly listening to a podcast that’s oriented around that skill
  • Volunteering to teach someone the basics of that skill for free (trying to teach someone else a subject can be an excellent way to test and strengthen your grasp on it)
  • Finding authoritative sources on the subject and absorbing their influences (e.g. books or articles they write, talks they give, etc)
  • Applying aspects of that skill to your current work (techniques such as “job crafting”) can be useful here

By combining lots of small forces together, which all point in a certain direction, you are much more likely to have yourself “carried along” in that direction, while hopefully avoiding excessive effort or pressure.

Credits

Similar ideas can be found in the Job Crafting movement, The Startup of You by Reid Hoffman and How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big by Scott Adams.

 

Downtime

Work and life comes to us in ebbs and flows. The “ebbs”, or “downtime”, can be a great opportunity for “slow thinking”.

Audio

Have you been working on a large, challenging, long-term undertaking? Perhaps a startup, or a large corporate project?

You are probably going to find that there are up-times and down-times. Ebbs and flows.

There will be stretches of time during which you’re fully engaged and “in-flow”, i.e. you’re spending multiple hours of a day, perhaps 6 or even 8, and those times are fully engaging you, and you’re using most of your mental and physical capacities, and you’re engaged in the immediate problem at hand.

But you will also probably notice that there are downtimes. These will vary in length and frequency, according to the nature and kind of work, the industry you’re in, etc. For example, some industries are seasonal. Some corporations have periods where people are away on holiday at certain times of the year. Some consulting relationships go through periods of less direct contact/communication with the client.

These “down” periods could go for months or weeks at a time, or parts of the week (e.g. weekdays vs. weekends), or parts of the day (e.g. morning vs. afternoon).

It can be helpful to notice these downtimes and to spot the patterns in them. This is because, during these downtimes, you can perform activities, mental or otherwise, which are better suited to downtime. Activities which would be more difficult to do during “uptime”.

During uptime, you’re in a more “reactive” move, responding rapidly to events and situations as they occur. Whereas during downtime, you can do more of what I call “slow thinking”.

By “slow thinking” I’m referring to things such as strategic thinking or long-term planning. Taking a step back and thinking about the bigger picture. Asking what you’re trying to do. What are the broad goals? Are my day-to-day actions (when I’m in “uptime”) appropriately focused on, and contributing to, those goals? And, heck, am I enjoying myself? Is this sustainable over the long term? Are there strategic changes or tweaks I could be making? For example, could I be taking my effort in one domain and applying it to a different market, where it’s more sought-after or more valuable, or applying it to an additional market, so that I can increase my customer-base?

Using down-time in this way may not only be beneficial – it may be critical. It may only be in those slower contemplative moments that you identify a major problem or issue or risk to what you’re doing, that otherwise would have gone un-noticed in the hustle and bustle of “getting stuff done”. So it can be important to pull yourself out of up-time, if needed, and deliberately move into down-time, to give yourself a proper chance to have insights you wouldn’t have otherwise had the time and space to have.

The down-time can function as a kind of rehearsal for up-time, because, during down-time, you are preparing ahead-of-time for the decisions you’ll need to make and the actions you’ll need to perform when you’re back in up-time again.

During down-time I recommend putting yourself in spaces and doing things that mentally relax and inspire you. Perhaps visiting a calm and peaceful place such as a park or a camping site. Perhaps walking or exercising. And giving your mind a chance to “tick over” everything. Everyone has a different way and you might have your own way of creating a space. But whichever way you choose, it should give your mind freedom to contemplate, wander, retrospect, revisit and then be strategic about the future and the next steps.

Orgchart

Organisational charts aren’t always up-to-date, or most useful to you. So why not draw your own?

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Does your organisation have an organisational chart? A diagram of the reporting relationships, in a hierarchical structure, is fairly common in companies, government departments, etc. These charts often exist on an Intranet, Wiki page, etc.

You may work in a smaller organisation, perhaps a startup or a small project team within a larger organisation. Perhaps in this situation, there is no formal, defined organisational chart.

Organisational charts aren’t always directly helpful. They may be out of date, and their intended audience may not be you, and so they may not be particularly applicable to you. They may be used for any number of purposes that you may or may not be aware of, and thus, they may not be the most useful document for you to refer to, in understanding the interpersonal relationships within the company.

So an idea I would like to share is: creating your own “personal organisational chart”.

You start with a blank sheet of paper (real paper, or perhaps virtual, if you’re using a tablet and stylus). Draw a stick figure in the middle of the page, representing yourself – you’re starting somewhere close to home, with you!

you

Then you think about the people who you communicate with directly, either day-to-day or periodically. People you are in meetings with, or report to, or otherwise interact with. Write their names around your “you” stick figure with spokes coming out from you to them. (You may want to draw those you are in more frequent contact with, or who are more crucial to your role, at a closer distance than others.)

2nd-degree

Then think of the people who these people interact with. Which people they talk to, refer to in meetings, etc. Draw them as spokes coming off the people you’re connected to. Keep working your way outward until you end up with kind of “web” or “network” of how the organisation fits together.

3rd-degree

The beauty of this kind of organisational chart is that its more relevant to you, because it starts with you in the middle! So it can enable you to visualise relationships in a way that informs you of where you sit, who you’re influencing, who’s seeing output of, or giving input to, your work. This is information that you can act on. It can help you to acheive your goals – doing a better job, engaging more effectively with the organisation, delivering work that’s more tailored to the needs of the organisation, etc. It can also help you to be selective about how you represent yourself, how you work with people, how you steer your role and even your career, with that organisation, going into the future.

Even long after you’ve left that organisation, when you revisit the experience, this org chart can serve as a memory aid, helping you to call to mind how that job was, what you did, what you learned, etc.

So there you have it – the “personal org chart”. Give it try!