Review

Want to receive a good review from a client or employer – one that wins you the right kind of work? Well, write your own!

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Have you ever read a positive review left by a client or employer about someone who provided a service, on their online profile or homepage? The review looked really good. It perhaps went like:

“I hired X several months ago to work on a project and was very happy with their output. Their communication skills were on-par. They got on well with the team.”

Have you ever read one of those positive reviews and thought, “goodness, I’d like to have one of those!”. You wouldn’t mind having a review like that on your profile. I had this thought go through my mind more than a few times!

Then I had this idea: what if I ask my next client for a review, but instead of asking for them to write it, I write the review for them? I could give it to them and say:

“Look, you don’t have to give me this favourable review if you don’t want to, but if you do, here’s a template. You can make any changes you want to make, or just write it yourself. But if you’d like to just go with the ideas I’ve got, then go for it!”

Happily this experiement of mine actually succeeded, and I ended up with a great review, that I could put to my profile.

I thought this was beneficial for two main reasons.

Firstly, it saved the client time and effort. Clients, like anyone, are busy people and have a lot to do, and they might not have the time or energy to write a positive review about someone. And they can’t necessarily remember much about what you were good at. They know you were good, but it takes a fair amount of effort to really specify in what ways you were good and then put that into writing. So it’s much easier for them to just use your writing, maybe tweak it a bit, and send it off. So it’s less effort for the client.

But secondly, and perhaps this was a bigger benefit, when you write your own review, you get to think about what you are good at and what you want to be good at, and what you want your brand and reputation to be.

This might take some thought. You might think about it over a weekend, or stretch it out over time, as with decisions, or just spend an hour or two in a room with a piece of paper. However you do it, if you think about what sort of review you want to have of your work, what you’d like others to say about your work and perhaps about you, that can be a really good exercise in itself. It can help you to figure out what you’re currently good at, and what you’d like to be good at in the future, and perhaps what work you’d like to be doing day-to-day.

So if you think ahead-of-time about and picture in your head what you’d like to be good at, say, 3 months’ time or 6 months’ time or a year’s time, then if you write a review of yourself as if you’re already good at that thing, then that gives you something to aim and strive for. It gives you more direction.

Once you’ve developed this review, you could even show it to the client and tell them something along the lines of:

“This is what I want to be good at, this is what I’m aiming for. I’ve like to get this review from you at some point in the future. So, let’s work together over the next 6 months and see if I can’t knock that out of the park!”

If your review aligns with the client’s goals, all the better, because they’ll also be happy and motivated to have you succeed at getting better.

And over time, as you get these good reviews, the reviews will help you to get into the kinds of roles you want and utilise the kinds of skills you want to utilise. For example, if you have a review that says that you have good communication skills and work will with people from diverse backgrounds, you’re more likely, in future, to get offers for roles that require people with those skills and abilities, and are tailored for those kinds of people.

So, over time, you can use carefully worded reviews to position yourself where you’d like to be in the job market. You can move into a space in your career that you enjoy and that uses your best capabilities and that pushes you in the direction you want to go.