Tough decisions to make? Try stretching out the decision-making process over a long period of time, giving yourself chance to view it from multiple angles and in the light of various aspects of your life.



Let’s face it – decisions can be difficult. They can feel stressful, all-or-nothing, black-or-white, either-or. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to have more time to make a decision, and to feel confident about it, without all the stress and second-guessing?

If you’re in a situation of having to make a decision in a very short time-frame, a situation that is essentially going to go one way or another by a certain date, regardless of what you do, then there’s probably a limit to what you can do.

Recently I’ve been thinking a bit differently about decisions and working at changing my behaviour so that I don’t face these situations quite so often.

When I look back over my history of decisions, a strategy I’ve found helpful is to identify and anticipate decisions that I might have to make at some point in the future, and then begin the process of thinking about those decisions in the present. Thus, the length of time between thinking and acting is stretched out over a much longer period than it would have otherwise been.

To take a decision apart, take it to pieces, and think about each of those pieces over a longer period of time. Instead of waiting until January, two years from now, I start to think about that decision right now.

This results in a slower, more reflective pace of thinking. With more time, I can think about the decision from more angles, perspectives, vantage-points. I can take my present, or even past, self and project that self into hypothetical scenarios that would occur if I decided either one way or another.

Thus, the decision-making process come to reflect and integrate a multitude of factors over a longer stretch of time, rather than being limited to the small number of more immediate factors.

Given enough time, perhaps a matter of months or even years, I can eventually get to a point where I know enough about the decision that it no longer becomes a decision. The alternatives are eliminated and the one correct path reveals itself. At that point, the decision is no longer a decision and I can just act.

One example of this is the decision of whether to take steps down a new career path. Perhaps involving study, research, etc. Is this an area I’m interested in? Is it a career path I would do well in? Now I could postpone doing anything until I had reached the point where I had to make a quick snap decision about whether or not to take the plunge into a new field. Say, when my current career-path turned into a dead-end.

But instead, at some regular interval (perhaps every weekend or so, or every now and then whilst walking to work), in a relaxed, non-urgent, non-directed manner, I can think about what it would be like if I went down that new career path. I can imagine what it would be like if I was going to do this new job today, and guage my motivation and energy I’d bring to it. I can absorb material about the career path (e.g. listen to a podcast or read an article about it) and project myself into the scenarios raised in that material. In a way, it’s like rehearsing for a performance – imagining the audience is there and the pressure is on, prior to actually having an audience.

Other factors to consider might include how that career transition would affect my self-image, how it would affect others’ perceptions, how sustainable it would be, how I would deal with temporary turbulence it might create.

In summary, the next time you face a decision, major or minor, why not put yourself into a time machine, travel back to the present moment, and start to slowly and gradually work through the decision in your mind. Stretch it out, give it time, and see if you can enjoy the process!


Work and life comes to us in ebbs and flows. The “ebbs”, or “downtime”, can be a great opportunity for “slow thinking”.


Have you been working on a large, challenging, long-term undertaking? Perhaps a startup, or a large corporate project?

You are probably going to find that there are up-times and down-times. Ebbs and flows.

There will be stretches of time during which you’re fully engaged and “in-flow”, i.e. you’re spending multiple hours of a day, perhaps 6 or even 8, and those times are fully engaging you, and you’re using most of your mental and physical capacities, and you’re engaged in the immediate problem at hand.

But you will also probably notice that there are downtimes. These will vary in length and frequency, according to the nature and kind of work, the industry you’re in, etc. For example, some industries are seasonal. Some corporations have periods where people are away on holiday at certain times of the year. Some consulting relationships go through periods of less direct contact/communication with the client.

These “down” periods could go for months or weeks at a time, or parts of the week (e.g. weekdays vs. weekends), or parts of the day (e.g. morning vs. afternoon).

It can be helpful to notice these downtimes and to spot the patterns in them. This is because, during these downtimes, you can perform activities, mental or otherwise, which are better suited to downtime. Activities which would be more difficult to do during “uptime”.

During uptime, you’re in a more “reactive” move, responding rapidly to events and situations as they occur. Whereas during downtime, you can do more of what I call “slow thinking”.

By “slow thinking” I’m referring to things such as strategic thinking or long-term planning. Taking a step back and thinking about the bigger picture. Asking what you’re trying to do. What are the broad goals? Are my day-to-day actions (when I’m in “uptime”) appropriately focused on, and contributing to, those goals? And, heck, am I enjoying myself? Is this sustainable over the long term? Are there strategic changes or tweaks I could be making? For example, could I be taking my effort in one domain and applying it to a different market, where it’s more sought-after or more valuable, or applying it to an additional market, so that I can increase my customer-base?

Using down-time in this way may not only be beneficial – it may be critical. It may only be in those slower contemplative moments that you identify a major problem or issue or risk to what you’re doing, that otherwise would have gone un-noticed in the hustle and bustle of “getting stuff done”. So it can be important to pull yourself out of up-time, if needed, and deliberately move into down-time, to give yourself a proper chance to have insights you wouldn’t have otherwise had the time and space to have.

The down-time can function as a kind of rehearsal for up-time, because, during down-time, you are preparing ahead-of-time for the decisions you’ll need to make and the actions you’ll need to perform when you’re back in up-time again.

During down-time I recommend putting yourself in spaces and doing things that mentally relax and inspire you. Perhaps visiting a calm and peaceful place such as a park or a camping site. Perhaps walking or exercising. And giving your mind a chance to “tick over” everything. Everyone has a different way and you might have your own way of creating a space. But whichever way you choose, it should give your mind freedom to contemplate, wander, retrospect, revisit and then be strategic about the future and the next steps.