Forces

Combining multiple small forces, all pushing you in a similar direction, you can move closer to your goals with less effort.

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Audio

Imagine a big, long-term goal you might have. Perhaps it’s to lose weight. Perhaps it’s to save up enough money to retire, or at least, to live more comfortably.

It’s the kind of goal that won’t happen overnight, and won’t happen without significant effort and perspiration (and perhaps risk).

You may find it very difficult to see that goal through to the end. There may be multiple factors over time that make it difficult. There are things that make it constantly difficult to achieve your goal.

For example, you’re trying to eat less in order to lose weight, but, almost constantly, occasions or situations seem to arise that make that goal difficult. For example, it’s late at night, you find yourself starving, and you find it hard to resist going to the freezer and reaching for the frozen pizza.

Or you’re trying to save money, but situations seem to keep arising that cause you to have to spend money.

A strategy I’ve found helpful is to try to position myself so that I have multiple forces pushing me toward my goal, rather than pulling me away from it.

Imagine a beach-ball on the pavement, which you’re trying to move without directly pushing it. You try blowing at it. But it’s a windy day and your breath is no competition for the winds blowing in multiple directions, perhaps even in your direction.

But now imagine if you and 3 friends stood in front of the ball, all of you holding leaf blowers. Each of you standing at a slightly different angle, but all aiming the ball in a generally common direction. That ball would be much more likely to go where you want it to!

And it can be the same with long-term goals and forces that push you one way or another in life.

Going back to the example of losing weight, if you rely only on your will power and, say, a diet plan, you may be on course for a while, but then veer off, due to other complex forces getting in the way.

But you could combine your will power and diet with multiple other forces. For example:

  • You could move house to a place that’s very close to a gym. Now that the gym in a few minutes’ walk away, rather than a 30 minute commute, it’s more likely that you’ll go there regularly.
  • You could make less food available to you at any given time. You even buy a smaller fridge, which can fit less food in it, so that instead of a few footsteps away, the food is a walk-to-the-shops away. Or you might put your food on a high shelf. Or try to spend less time at home, so that you’re not tempted.
  • You could get into a habit of preparing/cooking low-calorie, highly filling foods. This might mean learning cooking methods that are simple and fast. That way, you’re more motivated to, say, quick-steam some broccoli, rather than put a pizza in the microwave oven. (At least one person I know has gotten rid of their microwave altogether!)
  • You could attend some kind of support group or meetup of dieters, where you motivate eachother and give eachother tips. So the influence of that group pushes you in the direction of weight-loss.

Or take money as another example:

  • You could move to an area where rents are cheaper, so you’re paying less for housing.
  • You could also choose, among the cheaper places to live, an area that’s farther away from expensive shops, e.g. clothing stores or tech stores, so that there’s less temptation to spend money on these kinds of items.
  • You could let your friends know about your goals, and have them encourage and support those goals, perhaps even hold you to account for them!
  • You could visualise your goal – perhaps make a drawing about it and put that on your wall so you see it regularly, or set your morning “wake-up” alarm to some piece of audio that reminds you of your goal, say, a song or an excerpt from a speech.

If you have your life set up so that there are many forces pushing you where you want to go, then it’s more likely that you’ll get there by sheer inertia, even while your will-power and resolve goes through ups and downs.

These techniques can also be applied within the workforce, whether you’re a business owner, manager, employee, consultant, etc. For example, if you want to develop a new skill or competency, you could might try:

  • Regularly listening to a podcast that’s oriented around that skill
  • Volunteering to teach someone the basics of that skill for free (trying to teach someone else a subject can be an excellent way to test and strengthen your grasp on it)
  • Finding authoritative sources on the subject and absorbing their influences (e.g. books or articles they write, talks they give, etc)
  • Applying aspects of that skill to your current work (techniques such as “job crafting”) can be useful here

By combining lots of small forces together, which all point in a certain direction, you are much more likely to have yourself “carried along” in that direction, while hopefully avoiding excessive effort or pressure.

Credits

Similar ideas can be found in the Job Crafting movement, The Startup of You by Reid Hoffman and How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big by Scott Adams.

 

Company

What kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? Now, imagine your life as that company.

Audio

Imagine a large, buzzing company. It has a large, public audience and large customer base. It has many people working for it. It has a big portfolio of assets and liabilities and millions or billions of dollars of investments.

Could you think of yourself like a company?

You may not have millions of customers. However, consider people you interact with regularly. Perhaps colleagues, clients or clients, people in a meeting, even friends, relatives or aquaintances. These people could be thought of as an “audience”, or a number of “audiences” and perhaps as a customer-base.

You may not have many (or even any) employees. However, consider people you pay. Perhaps you run a small business and have a few people on the payroll. Or perhaps there are people you pay for personal goods and services – the hairdresser, the person at the checkout, a legal professional, the barista at the coffee shop. They are all people who you pay for their time and effort. These people could be thought of as “employees”.

You may not be dealing in financial accounts in the millions. However, consider your personal finances. What are some assets that you might have yourself? You might have money in savings, in a bank account, or money available on credit. You might have physical assets, such as a home that you own or rent, a car or bike for transportation, etc. You might have equipment, such as computers, storage facilities, tools. These could be thought of as assets. You likely also have liabilities, perhaps a mortgage on a house.

Finally, most companies have products that they sell and/or services that they provide. Well most likely there are products and/or services that you provide. The service might be the line of work that you do, for those who employ you or for your clients. If you’re a student then perhaps there are people in your network, e.g. other students you help out or internships / apprenticeships you take. And there are services you will provide in the future, when you do get a job.

There are other things you might think of as being “assets” or “property” of a company, such as brand, culture, style. These things can be intangible, but strongly affect a company, giving off a vibe or a feeling to customers and employees about what that company stands for. You could think of yourself as having these kinds of characteristics. A personal brand. A personality. A characteristic or perspective that you bring to a situation, and that people recognise you by. These could be thought of as intangible assets.

A company can have a history and a culture, and so can you. Whether its your accent, your handwriting, a vocabulary, a religious upbringing, you bring with you a whole myriad of historical and cultural influences, coming from your family and/or the environment you grew up in.

Finally, companies have partnerships, and so do you. Whenever you ask a friend for help with something specific, which you know they will be more knowledgeable about, and which you prefer not to focus on, that could be thought of as a partnership. Perhaps you have a very close partnership in the form of a relationship. Or other kinds of partnerships, such as people you trust to get advice from, in certain specific areas. Or people you do business with or in some other way, in which there’s a division of labour.

If you consider all of the above areas of life, and how they are similar to the functioning of a company, that could lead to some interesting questions.

Where do your strengths lie? What are your core and non-core competencies? What kind of role do you want to play, in the ecosystem of people and influences in which you find yourself? What opportunities exist, given the above? And what are the constraints of limiting factors you need to be mindful of?

What kind of company would you want to run if you were a CEO? In a sense, you already are a CEO. You have products/services that you offer. You have an audience and perhaps customers and clients. You have assets – tangible and intangible. You have a kind of brand, style, history, culture, whatever you call it.

By thinking of yourself as the CEO of the company that is “your life”, you can start to make choices that steer your life in the direction you would prefer.

You might think about your audience. The people you interact with. Survey the different groups of people and what they’re looking for. And see if you can tailor your messages to them. Perhaps you can serve them in a different way. One that gives you an opportunity to shine, and do your best work.

You might think about where and how you spend pay for services and products. There may be ways to reduce spending on things that aren’t essential or core to your life. But there may also be ways to increase or channel spending, which make you better and stronger and the core of what you do. Some basic examples may be tools, books, education, courses, events. But there may be other less obvious ways of spending money that give you a boost. All of these could be seen as re-investments back into your own growth.

You might think about your history, culture and personal style. How do these currently work to help you. Might there be aspects of your background that you hadn’t thought about in a while, which you could explore and perhaps bring out more, to reap advantages?

You might think about your partnerships. What are some partnerships that you are currently in, which work well for you? Are there other partnerships you haven’t looked into yet, which you might offer value?

Finally, you no doubt have values. Moral or ethical concepts that come out of your background and/or that you have made a deliberate effort to cultivate. You may or may not be able to practice them in every situation, but the more you steer your life in the direction of those values, through small choices you make on a regular basis, the more you can steer yourself towards a life in which you can practice them in most, if not all, situations.

So what kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? And how would you run your life as the CEO of that company?

Schedule

Does your schedule work for you? Here I present the “modular schedule” – a way of introducing flexibility and adaptability while preserving consistency and regularity.

Audio

Open your calendar. Maybe it’s a physical calendar on your desk. Maybe it’s a virtual calendar on your smartphone, tablet or laptop. Have a look at the grid. You can see days of the week and times of the day. And the calendar tool enables you to easily create appointments and meetings and reminders. And those can easily be made to recur, so that, for example, every Wednesday at the same time, you attend an exercise class, or every Friday night at this time, you meet this person.

Using these tools can help you to structure your time and introduce some consistency and regularity, which helps you to get into productive rhythms, predict your free time and balance various priorities.

However, using such tools may also introduce a fair amount of rigidity. For example, you might have exercise on Wednesday night, but you start to feel very sick on Wednesday afternoon, forcing you to skip exercise. Or you have to miss your regular appointment on Friday night, because you realise you’ll be away on a trip, and won’t be back in time. Or you miss some other appointment because something comes up, e.g. a lengthy tax return.

A calendar with regular events occurring every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
A standard calendar features consistency and regularity, but might it also be rigid and inflexible?

Is there a way to schedule that gives us some structure, but also some flexibility?

Recently I’ve been partially experimenting with what I’ll call a “modular schedule“. Rather than scheduling specific dates and times for an event, I’ll just specify a duration (and optionally, a location) and make the event a moveable “module”.

Say it’s exercise – e.g. weight training. I decide on a place that I’ll do that, the gym. I know where that place is and how long it will take to get there. I know what activities I’ll be doing and what equipment I’ll need. And I can time-box it to, say, 1.5 hours (including travel time). So there is a sense of regularity and expectation in the event.

But because I’m not pinning it down to a time and date, the event can be moved and changed. So if I’m too sick to exercise on Wednesday, that module is still there, and it can be moved to the next day or two days later. I can take a moment on Thursday to pause, and think, “well, I’m feeling well now, and I’ve got 3 hours free, what can I do?”. And then it’s easy to slot in that 1.5-hour module exercise.

Two modules – a 1-hour exercise module and a 15-minute coffee with Jill module
Example of a modular schedule. Two modules – time-boxed, but also moveable.

By using this method, it can become easier to change and adapt your schedule on-the-fly, because you have a small set of recurring activities in mind, along with how long they’ll take (and where you’ll do them), but because you haven’t locked yourself into a time (and perhaps place, if it can be done anywhere), then you can move those activities around. You can cancel, re-order, manipulate, move them around, just like chess pieces on a board.

Another advantage of this technique is that it can enable you to allocate time more strategically. So if there’s a particularly good moment to do something, you can wait until that moment. For example, perhaps its a sunny day and the weather is nice and warm, and you think, “that’s a perfect time to walk the dog”. So you can take move your “walking the dog” module to that time. Or maybe it’s rainy, cold and miserable outside, so now is the perfect time to go to the library or the cafe, open your laptop, and get some work done. You’re making more efficient use of your time, because you’re choosing moments or contexts which will fit the best with the activities you’re performing.

So you won’t find yourself, for example, working hard on your laptop while it’s beautiful and sunny outside and you feel like exercise. Or you won’t find yourself trying to walk the dog when it’s rainy and cold outside.

So that’s the “modular schedule”. Give it a try!

PS. It will be interesting to see if software tools come out in the future, that facilitate more flexible modes of arranging time. But if you internalise this technique, add it to your mental toolbox, it can be pretty easy to start automatically making certain activities more modular, without even needing to refer to a physical or digital calendar.