Slow

Slowing down can actually help you speed up! How? By enabling you to focus and unlocking the foundations of your knowledge domain.

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Audio

In today’s world, there seems to be much usage of words like “rapid”, “change”, “quick”, “speed”, “fast”, “instant”, “agile”, “responsive”, etc.

I have noticed that, when the meanings of these words get mixed in with emotions and thought process of work, they can lead to a feeling of being hurried or harried, of rushing, of deadlines, of insufficient time. The word “deadline” itself seems kind of scary, carrying the connotation of “dead”!

Because we feel that there isn’t enough time, often quite rightly, we are forced to go fast and rush. That in turn can lead to a feeling of pressure. That we’re trying to work quickly, but there isn’t enough time, so we are stretched or pressured.

However, I have found that when I am actually going fast – delivering lots of work rapidly and on-time, I don’t feel hurried or harried at all. In fact, I feel quite calm, relaxed and that there’s time, and I don’t feel too pressured or stretched.

So what does it really mean to be rapid, agile, responsive, fast?

Firstly, I have found that when you put pressure on yourself, you arc up, your body becomes stiff, your breathing becomes shallower. It becomes more difficult to focus, and you start to have your focus split or fragmented between a lot of different things. This loss of focus, in turn, leads to a loss of productivity and a loss of sustainable productive energy. So, while I can pump out work in a panic for a short period of time, over a longer period, it becomes unsustainable.

Secondly, I have found that the fragmentation of focus can lead to a dismantling of the ability to properly understand a problem and a problem-space. That is, because insufficient time has been spent on discovering and then solidly grasping of the foundations of a structure of knowledge, your ability to work at the higher levels of that structure becomes slow, repetitive, inefficient and tedious. You have to repetitively go through multiple iterations of the same problem before identifying the root of it, when you could have discovered the root right from the start, if you thoroughly understood the foundations of what you’re working with.

My solutions?

Firstly, rather than taking on that hurred, pressured mind-set and body language, I have found it generally better, at almost any cost, to relax and take on a cooler disposition and demeanor.

Secondly, I try to reduce the number of elements that I focus on at any one time. For example, instead of trying to deliver an entire three page report all at once, I focus on just writing one really good paragraph. Or, instead of trying to deliver multiple screens of an application, I just focus on one screen, or on one link between two screens. Or, instead of trying to deliver an entire module of code, I just focus on one or two individual functions.

Or, instead of trying to speed-read an entire chapter of a book, I spend a long time reading the first couple of pages, so that I get a very firm grasp of the foundation that the chapter rests on. In this last case, I have found that reading a book this way often leads to mentally “unlocking” the conceptual framework of the book, such that I then understand the contents so well that speed-reading actually works!

When you deliver that small amount of work, you may get a small dopamine kick. You feel a sense of achievement. You might even reward yourself with a treat! (Say, a tasty snack, or drink, or a short break.)

Because you’re reducing your focus to one element at a time, you’re able to deliver more rapidly and responsively. You can deliver a small part rapidly, then another one.

I believe this is the real spirit of many of the ideas of “agile”, “iteration”, etc. It’s not a spirit of pressure, rushing, panic, etc., but rather, of slowing down, identifying one or two things that you can break off and focus on. Those things being small enough that you can deliver them, learn from them, and then decide on your next step as appropriate.

Orgchart

Organisational charts aren’t always up-to-date, or most useful to you. So why not draw your own?

Audio

Does your organisation have an organisational chart? A diagram of the reporting relationships, in a hierarchical structure, is fairly common in companies, government departments, etc. These charts often exist on an Intranet, Wiki page, etc.

You may work in a smaller organisation, perhaps a startup or a small project team within a larger organisation. Perhaps in this situation, there is no formal, defined organisational chart.

Organisational charts aren’t always directly helpful. They may be out of date, and their intended audience may not be you, and so they may not be particularly applicable to you. They may be used for any number of purposes that you may or may not be aware of, and thus, they may not be the most useful document for you to refer to, in understanding the interpersonal relationships within the company.

So an idea I would like to share is: creating your own “personal organisational chart”.

You start with a blank sheet of paper (real paper, or perhaps virtual, if you’re using a tablet and stylus). Draw a stick figure in the middle of the page, representing yourself – you’re starting somewhere close to home, with you!

you

Then you think about the people who you communicate with directly, either day-to-day or periodically. People you are in meetings with, or report to, or otherwise interact with. Write their names around your “you” stick figure with spokes coming out from you to them. (You may want to draw those you are in more frequent contact with, or who are more crucial to your role, at a closer distance than others.)

2nd-degree

Then think of the people who these people interact with. Which people they talk to, refer to in meetings, etc. Draw them as spokes coming off the people you’re connected to. Keep working your way outward until you end up with kind of “web” or “network” of how the organisation fits together.

3rd-degree

The beauty of this kind of organisational chart is that its more relevant to you, because it starts with you in the middle! So it can enable you to visualise relationships in a way that informs you of where you sit, who you’re influencing, who’s seeing output of, or giving input to, your work. This is information that you can act on. It can help you to acheive your goals – doing a better job, engaging more effectively with the organisation, delivering work that’s more tailored to the needs of the organisation, etc. It can also help you to be selective about how you represent yourself, how you work with people, how you steer your role and even your career, with that organisation, going into the future.

Even long after you’ve left that organisation, when you revisit the experience, this org chart can serve as a memory aid, helping you to call to mind how that job was, what you did, what you learned, etc.

So there you have it – the “personal org chart”. Give it try!