Review

Want to receive a good review from a client or employer – one that wins you the right kind of work? Well, write your own!

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Audio

Have you ever read a positive review left by a client or employer about someone who provided a service, on their online profile or homepage? The review looked really good. It perhaps went like:

“I hired X several months ago to work on a project and was very happy with their output. Their communication skills were on-par. They got on well with the team.”

Have you ever read one of those positive reviews and thought, “goodness, I’d like to have one of those!”. You wouldn’t mind having a review like that on your profile. I had this thought go through my mind more than a few times!

Then I had this idea: what if I ask my next client for a review, but instead of asking for them to write it, I write the review for them? I could give it to them and say:

“Look, you don’t have to give me this favourable review if you don’t want to, but if you do, here’s a template. You can make any changes you want to make, or just write it yourself. But if you’d like to just go with the ideas I’ve got, then go for it!”

Happily this experiement of mine actually succeeded, and I ended up with a great review, that I could put to my profile.

I thought this was beneficial for two main reasons.

Firstly, it saved the client time and effort. Clients, like anyone, are busy people and have a lot to do, and they might not have the time or energy to write a positive review about someone. And they can’t necessarily remember much about what you were good at. They know you were good, but it takes a fair amount of effort to really specify in what ways you were good and then put that into writing. So it’s much easier for them to just use your writing, maybe tweak it a bit, and send it off. So it’s less effort for the client.

But secondly, and perhaps this was a bigger benefit, when you write your own review, you get to think about what you are good at and what you want to be good at, and what you want your brand and reputation to be.

This might take some thought. You might think about it over a weekend, or stretch it out over time, as with decisions, or just spend an hour or two in a room with a piece of paper. However you do it, if you think about what sort of review you want to have of your work, what you’d like others to say about your work and perhaps about you, that can be a really good exercise in itself. It can help you to figure out what you’re currently good at, and what you’d like to be good at in the future, and perhaps what work you’d like to be doing day-to-day.

So if you think ahead-of-time about and picture in your head what you’d like to be good at, say, 3 months’ time or 6 months’ time or a year’s time, then if you write a review of yourself as if you’re already good at that thing, then that gives you something to aim and strive for. It gives you more direction.

Once you’ve developed this review, you could even show it to the client and tell them something along the lines of:

“This is what I want to be good at, this is what I’m aiming for. I’ve like to get this review from you at some point in the future. So, let’s work together over the next 6 months and see if I can’t knock that out of the park!”

If your review aligns with the client’s goals, all the better, because they’ll also be happy and motivated to have you succeed at getting better.

And over time, as you get these good reviews, the reviews will help you to get into the kinds of roles you want and utilise the kinds of skills you want to utilise. For example, if you have a review that says that you have good communication skills and work will with people from diverse backgrounds, you’re more likely, in future, to get offers for roles that require people with those skills and abilities, and are tailored for those kinds of people.

So, over time, you can use carefully worded reviews to position yourself where you’d like to be in the job market. You can move into a space in your career that you enjoy and that uses your best capabilities and that pushes you in the direction you want to go.

Forces

Combining multiple small forces, all pushing you in a similar direction, you can move closer to your goals with less effort.

Audio

Imagine a big, long-term goal you might have. Perhaps it’s to lose weight. Perhaps it’s to save up enough money to retire, or at least, to live more comfortably.

It’s the kind of goal that won’t happen overnight, and won’t happen without significant effort and perspiration (and perhaps risk).

You may find it very difficult to see that goal through to the end. There may be multiple factors over time that make it difficult. There are things that make it constantly difficult to achieve your goal.

For example, you’re trying to eat less in order to lose weight, but, almost constantly, occasions or situations seem to arise that make that goal difficult. For example, it’s late at night, you find yourself starving, and you find it hard to resist going to the freezer and reaching for the frozen pizza.

Or you’re trying to save money, but situations seem to keep arising that cause you to have to spend money.

A strategy I’ve found helpful is to try to position myself so that I have multiple forces pushing me toward my goal, rather than pulling me away from it.

Imagine a beach-ball on the pavement, which you’re trying to move without directly pushing it. You try blowing at it. But it’s a windy day and your breath is no competition for the winds blowing in multiple directions, perhaps even in your direction.

But now imagine if you and 3 friends stood in front of the ball, all of you holding leaf blowers. Each of you standing at a slightly different angle, but all aiming the ball in a generally common direction. That ball would be much more likely to go where you want it to!

And it can be the same with long-term goals and forces that push you one way or another in life.

Going back to the example of losing weight, if you rely only on your will power and, say, a diet plan, you may be on course for a while, but then veer off, due to other complex forces getting in the way.

But you could combine your will power and diet with multiple other forces. For example:

  • You could move house to a place that’s very close to a gym. Now that the gym in a few minutes’ walk away, rather than a 30 minute commute, it’s more likely that you’ll go there regularly.
  • You could make less food available to you at any given time. You even buy a smaller fridge, which can fit less food in it, so that instead of a few footsteps away, the food is a walk-to-the-shops away. Or you might put your food on a high shelf. Or try to spend less time at home, so that you’re not tempted.
  • You could get into a habit of preparing/cooking low-calorie, highly filling foods. This might mean learning cooking methods that are simple and fast. That way, you’re more motivated to, say, quick-steam some broccoli, rather than put a pizza in the microwave oven. (At least one person I know has gotten rid of their microwave altogether!)
  • You could attend some kind of support group or meetup of dieters, where you motivate eachother and give eachother tips. So the influence of that group pushes you in the direction of weight-loss.

Or take money as another example:

  • You could move to an area where rents are cheaper, so you’re paying less for housing.
  • You could also choose, among the cheaper places to live, an area that’s farther away from expensive shops, e.g. clothing stores or tech stores, so that there’s less temptation to spend money on these kinds of items.
  • You could let your friends know about your goals, and have them encourage and support those goals, perhaps even hold you to account for them!
  • You could visualise your goal – perhaps make a drawing about it and put that on your wall so you see it regularly, or set your morning “wake-up” alarm to some piece of audio that reminds you of your goal, say, a song or an excerpt from a speech.

If you have your life set up so that there are many forces pushing you where you want to go, then it’s more likely that you’ll get there by sheer inertia, even while your will-power and resolve goes through ups and downs.

These techniques can also be applied within the workforce, whether you’re a business owner, manager, employee, consultant, etc. For example, if you want to develop a new skill or competency, you could might try:

  • Regularly listening to a podcast that’s oriented around that skill
  • Volunteering to teach someone the basics of that skill for free (trying to teach someone else a subject can be an excellent way to test and strengthen your grasp on it)
  • Finding authoritative sources on the subject and absorbing their influences (e.g. books or articles they write, talks they give, etc)
  • Applying aspects of that skill to your current work (techniques such as “job crafting”) can be useful here

By combining lots of small forces together, which all point in a certain direction, you are much more likely to have yourself “carried along” in that direction, while hopefully avoiding excessive effort or pressure.

Credits

Similar ideas can be found in the Job Crafting movement, The Startup of You by Reid Hoffman and How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big by Scott Adams.

 

Company

What kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? Now, imagine your life as that company.

Audio

Imagine a large, buzzing company. It has a large, public audience and large customer base. It has many people working for it. It has a big portfolio of assets and liabilities and millions or billions of dollars of investments.

Could you think of yourself like a company?

You may not have millions of customers. However, consider people you interact with regularly. Perhaps colleagues, clients or clients, people in a meeting, even friends, relatives or aquaintances. These people could be thought of as an “audience”, or a number of “audiences” and perhaps as a customer-base.

You may not have many (or even any) employees. However, consider people you pay. Perhaps you run a small business and have a few people on the payroll. Or perhaps there are people you pay for personal goods and services – the hairdresser, the person at the checkout, a legal professional, the barista at the coffee shop. They are all people who you pay for their time and effort. These people could be thought of as “employees”.

You may not be dealing in financial accounts in the millions. However, consider your personal finances. What are some assets that you might have yourself? You might have money in savings, in a bank account, or money available on credit. You might have physical assets, such as a home that you own or rent, a car or bike for transportation, etc. You might have equipment, such as computers, storage facilities, tools. These could be thought of as assets. You likely also have liabilities, perhaps a mortgage on a house.

Finally, most companies have products that they sell and/or services that they provide. Well most likely there are products and/or services that you provide. The service might be the line of work that you do, for those who employ you or for your clients. If you’re a student then perhaps there are people in your network, e.g. other students you help out or internships / apprenticeships you take. And there are services you will provide in the future, when you do get a job.

There are other things you might think of as being “assets” or “property” of a company, such as brand, culture, style. These things can be intangible, but strongly affect a company, giving off a vibe or a feeling to customers and employees about what that company stands for. You could think of yourself as having these kinds of characteristics. A personal brand. A personality. A characteristic or perspective that you bring to a situation, and that people recognise you by. These could be thought of as intangible assets.

A company can have a history and a culture, and so can you. Whether its your accent, your handwriting, a vocabulary, a religious upbringing, you bring with you a whole myriad of historical and cultural influences, coming from your family and/or the environment you grew up in.

Finally, companies have partnerships, and so do you. Whenever you ask a friend for help with something specific, which you know they will be more knowledgeable about, and which you prefer not to focus on, that could be thought of as a partnership. Perhaps you have a very close partnership in the form of a relationship. Or other kinds of partnerships, such as people you trust to get advice from, in certain specific areas. Or people you do business with or in some other way, in which there’s a division of labour.

If you consider all of the above areas of life, and how they are similar to the functioning of a company, that could lead to some interesting questions.

Where do your strengths lie? What are your core and non-core competencies? What kind of role do you want to play, in the ecosystem of people and influences in which you find yourself? What opportunities exist, given the above? And what are the constraints of limiting factors you need to be mindful of?

What kind of company would you want to run if you were a CEO? In a sense, you already are a CEO. You have products/services that you offer. You have an audience and perhaps customers and clients. You have assets – tangible and intangible. You have a kind of brand, style, history, culture, whatever you call it.

By thinking of yourself as the CEO of the company that is “your life”, you can start to make choices that steer your life in the direction you would prefer.

You might think about your audience. The people you interact with. Survey the different groups of people and what they’re looking for. And see if you can tailor your messages to them. Perhaps you can serve them in a different way. One that gives you an opportunity to shine, and do your best work.

You might think about where and how you spend pay for services and products. There may be ways to reduce spending on things that aren’t essential or core to your life. But there may also be ways to increase or channel spending, which make you better and stronger and the core of what you do. Some basic examples may be tools, books, education, courses, events. But there may be other less obvious ways of spending money that give you a boost. All of these could be seen as re-investments back into your own growth.

You might think about your history, culture and personal style. How do these currently work to help you. Might there be aspects of your background that you hadn’t thought about in a while, which you could explore and perhaps bring out more, to reap advantages?

You might think about your partnerships. What are some partnerships that you are currently in, which work well for you? Are there other partnerships you haven’t looked into yet, which you might offer value?

Finally, you no doubt have values. Moral or ethical concepts that come out of your background and/or that you have made a deliberate effort to cultivate. You may or may not be able to practice them in every situation, but the more you steer your life in the direction of those values, through small choices you make on a regular basis, the more you can steer yourself towards a life in which you can practice them in most, if not all, situations.

So what kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? And how would you run your life as the CEO of that company?