Decision

Tough decisions to make? Try stretching out the decision-making process over a long period of time, giving yourself chance to view it from multiple angles and in the light of various aspects of your life.

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Let’s face it – decisions can be difficult. They can feel stressful, all-or-nothing, black-or-white, either-or. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to have more time to make a decision, and to feel confident about it, without all the stress and second-guessing?

If you’re in a situation of having to make a decision in a very short time-frame, a situation that is essentially going to go one way or another by a certain date, regardless of what you do, then there’s probably a limit to what you can do.

Recently I’ve been thinking a bit differently about decisions and working at changing my behaviour so that I don’t face these situations quite so often.

When I look back over my history of decisions, a strategy I’ve found helpful is to identify and anticipate decisions that I might have to make at some point in the future, and then begin the process of thinking about those decisions in the present. Thus, the length of time between thinking and acting is stretched out over a much longer period than it would have otherwise been.

To take a decision apart, take it to pieces, and think about each of those pieces over a longer period of time. Instead of waiting until January, two years from now, I start to think about that decision right now.

This results in a slower, more reflective pace of thinking. With more time, I can think about the decision from more angles, perspectives, vantage-points. I can take my present, or even past, self and project that self into hypothetical scenarios that would occur if I decided either one way or another.

Thus, the decision-making process come to reflect and integrate a multitude of factors over a longer stretch of time, rather than being limited to the small number of more immediate factors.

Given enough time, perhaps a matter of months or even years, I can eventually get to a point where I know enough about the decision that it no longer becomes a decision. The alternatives are eliminated and the one correct path reveals itself. At that point, the decision is no longer a decision and I can just act.

One example of this is the decision of whether to take steps down a new career path. Perhaps involving study, research, etc. Is this an area I’m interested in? Is it a career path I would do well in? Now I could postpone doing anything until I had reached the point where I had to make a quick snap decision about whether or not to take the plunge into a new field. Say, when my current career-path turned into a dead-end.

But instead, at some regular interval (perhaps every weekend or so, or every now and then whilst walking to work), in a relaxed, non-urgent, non-directed manner, I can think about what it would be like if I went down that new career path. I can imagine what it would be like if I was going to do this new job today, and guage my motivation and energy I’d bring to it. I can absorb material about the career path (e.g. listen to a podcast or read an article about it) and project myself into the scenarios raised in that material. In a way, it’s like rehearsing for a performance – imagining the audience is there and the pressure is on, prior to actually having an audience.

Other factors to consider might include how that career transition would affect my self-image, how it would affect others’ perceptions, how sustainable it would be, how I would deal with temporary turbulence it might create.

In summary, the next time you face a decision, major or minor, why not put yourself into a time machine, travel back to the present moment, and start to slowly and gradually work through the decision in your mind. Stretch it out, give it time, and see if you can enjoy the process!

Career

Thinking of your career creatively (as a journey or as a canvas) can give you insights and motivation.

Chances are you won’t have the same kind of job that your parents had. Nor the same career path. The nature of jobs and work have changed. In particular, jobs today are shorter-term, and one’s career path is open and likely to change over your lifetime. You will likely find yourself performing different kinds of activities and utilising different skill-sets and different points in your life.

This can present challenges and difficulties, but it also present opportunities. You now have the opportunity to “design your career”. What does this mean?

Well, you can take a look at the jobs you’ve done and the companies you’ve worked at, non-commercial activity you’ve been involved with (such as non-profit work, hobbies, etc), your education, and other factors, and see them as a kind of “portfolio”.

You can start to envisage your career-to-date in various creative ways. You could look at it as a journey, with each different job or project as a step in that journey, which in turn, opens the door to future steps. Or you could look at it as a canvas, where, rather than being sequentially ordered in time, it’s more like a spacious “surface”, in which the jobs or projects are like brush strokes, which each contribute to form an overall picture.

What’s the point of all this “creative thinking”? Well, when you look at the journey or colours of your career, you can get ideas of where to go next.

One principle I have brough to bear here is balance. That is, when I’ve developed my career all the way in one particular direction (let’s just call it “north”), then I try to think of ways to develop it in a different direction (let’s say “south-east”). In my personal case, I had a long history in software development in the private sector. I decided to apply some balance to my profile by seeking more work in government and by studying Interaction Design.

You can find balance in other ways. Perhaps all your work thusfar was in one particular city. You could try to work in a different city for a change. Or perhaps your work was usually long-term, multi-year projects. You could balance it out by doing a few shorter stints.

There’s no right or wrong way here, and you probably want to be selective about where you apply balance.

But by being strategic about your choices of where, how and what work you do, within the constraints of what you have control over (e.g. your employability), you can create a stronger overall portfolio and shape your career to more closely fit your real interests, passions and abilities.

For example, if you’re a film producer with 6 years of experience, you might be appealing to companies who are looking to produce promotional videos. But what if you were a film producer who had also done some work in real estate and taken a short course in marketing? Then you might be extermely appealing to a real estate company who are looking to produce videos to market their properties.

As an alternative to balance, you can also look at complementarity. Different industries can complement eachother (e.g. fashion and design) and different locations can complement eachother (e.g. Australia and China, both being in the Asia-Pacific region).

So go grab a time-machine or a paintbrush, and get designery with your career! Your work history belongs to you. It’s your property in a way. See if you can find ways to craft it to your liking.

Company

What kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? Now, imagine your life as that company.

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Imagine a large, buzzing company. It has a large, public audience and large customer base. It has many people working for it. It has a big portfolio of assets and liabilities and millions or billions of dollars of investments.

Could you think of yourself like a company?

You may not have millions of customers. However, consider people you interact with regularly. Perhaps colleagues, clients or clients, people in a meeting, even friends, relatives or aquaintances. These people could be thought of as an “audience”, or a number of “audiences” and perhaps as a customer-base.

You may not have many (or even any) employees. However, consider people you pay. Perhaps you run a small business and have a few people on the payroll. Or perhaps there are people you pay for personal goods and services – the hairdresser, the person at the checkout, a legal professional, the barista at the coffee shop. They are all people who you pay for their time and effort. These people could be thought of as “employees”.

You may not be dealing in financial accounts in the millions. However, consider your personal finances. What are some assets that you might have yourself? You might have money in savings, in a bank account, or money available on credit. You might have physical assets, such as a home that you own or rent, a car or bike for transportation, etc. You might have equipment, such as computers, storage facilities, tools. These could be thought of as assets. You likely also have liabilities, perhaps a mortgage on a house.

Finally, most companies have products that they sell and/or services that they provide. Well most likely there are products and/or services that you provide. The service might be the line of work that you do, for those who employ you or for your clients. If you’re a student then perhaps there are people in your network, e.g. other students you help out or internships / apprenticeships you take. And there are services you will provide in the future, when you do get a job.

There are other things you might think of as being “assets” or “property” of a company, such as brand, culture, style. These things can be intangible, but strongly affect a company, giving off a vibe or a feeling to customers and employees about what that company stands for. You could think of yourself as having these kinds of characteristics. A personal brand. A personality. A characteristic or perspective that you bring to a situation, and that people recognise you by. These could be thought of as intangible assets.

A company can have a history and a culture, and so can you. Whether its your accent, your handwriting, a vocabulary, a religious upbringing, you bring with you a whole myriad of historical and cultural influences, coming from your family and/or the environment you grew up in.

Finally, companies have partnerships, and so do you. Whenever you ask a friend for help with something specific, which you know they will be more knowledgeable about, and which you prefer not to focus on, that could be thought of as a partnership. Perhaps you have a very close partnership in the form of a relationship. Or other kinds of partnerships, such as people you trust to get advice from, in certain specific areas. Or people you do business with or in some other way, in which there’s a division of labour.

If you consider all of the above areas of life, and how they are similar to the functioning of a company, that could lead to some interesting questions.

Where do your strengths lie? What are your core and non-core competencies? What kind of role do you want to play, in the ecosystem of people and influences in which you find yourself? What opportunities exist, given the above? And what are the constraints of limiting factors you need to be mindful of?

What kind of company would you want to run if you were a CEO? In a sense, you already are a CEO. You have products/services that you offer. You have an audience and perhaps customers and clients. You have assets – tangible and intangible. You have a kind of brand, style, history, culture, whatever you call it.

By thinking of yourself as the CEO of the company that is “your life”, you can start to make choices that steer your life in the direction you would prefer.

You might think about your audience. The people you interact with. Survey the different groups of people and what they’re looking for. And see if you can tailor your messages to them. Perhaps you can serve them in a different way. One that gives you an opportunity to shine, and do your best work.

You might think about where and how you spend pay for services and products. There may be ways to reduce spending on things that aren’t essential or core to your life. But there may also be ways to increase or channel spending, which make you better and stronger and the core of what you do. Some basic examples may be tools, books, education, courses, events. But there may be other less obvious ways of spending money that give you a boost. All of these could be seen as re-investments back into your own growth.

You might think about your history, culture and personal style. How do these currently work to help you. Might there be aspects of your background that you hadn’t thought about in a while, which you could explore and perhaps bring out more, to reap advantages?

You might think about your partnerships. What are some partnerships that you are currently in, which work well for you? Are there other partnerships you haven’t looked into yet, which you might offer value?

Finally, you no doubt have values. Moral or ethical concepts that come out of your background and/or that you have made a deliberate effort to cultivate. You may or may not be able to practice them in every situation, but the more you steer your life in the direction of those values, through small choices you make on a regular basis, the more you can steer yourself towards a life in which you can practice them in most, if not all, situations.

So what kind of company would you want to run, if you had to choose? And how would you run your life as the CEO of that company?

Revisit

Revisiting your past, including your career history, may give you valuable insights, increase your comfort/confidence and help you to steer your future.

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Have you ever revisited something from the past?

Perhaps a restaurant you hadn’t eaten at for a while, or a suburb you hadn’t visited, or a friend or family member from the past, who you hadn’t seen for a while. People you’d worked with, employers who hired you or clients you did work for.

When you revisited that place or person, perhaps some old feelings came back. Or maybe it was fresh – you noticed some changes and it even felt like a new experience.

It can be an interesting exercise to mentally revisit experiences of places and people.

You can apply this idea of mentally revisiting to your career history. You can recall the details of the jobs you held.  What you did. Who you worked with. The way decisions were made. The way conflicts were managed. The way the team worked together. The end results.

Remembering those details can give you some fresh insights – insights about yourself and others, about why you were hired, about why particular decisions were made and about the general landscape of your profession. You can identify common elements in your career history, which reveal, for example, where your strengths and weaknesses lie, what you enjoy / don’t enjoy and what you, as a person, bring to a situation.

One category of experience you can re-visit is the challenge. Perhaps a person or a thing might have troubled you in the past. Maybe it was a difficult job. Maybe it was a person who you found difficult to get along with. Maybe it was a relationship that went through some turbulence. By revisiting a challenge you had, you can gain insights into why that challenge arose, how you dealt with it, how you might deal with it the same (or differently) today. You might realise some way to avoid such a challenge in the future.

One of the cool things about going back and revisiting a past experience is that you can think about it with fresh eyes. You can take your present self, as you are now, and project that self back into the past, and that can give you new insights into that situation. You might assume that you learned everything that could be learned about an experience at the time you had it, and there’s nothing more to be learned. But there may actually be a wealth of new things to be learned, from your present perspective.

Another cool benefit of revisiting a past experience is that you can become more comfortable with it. Perhaps the experience was distressing or uncomfortable in some way. Perhaps it was confusing and you weren’t able to grasp exactly what was happening at the time or why. By going back to it again, now that you’re out of it, you can become more comfortable and acquainted with that experience. Rather than being a “black-box”, a past experience can be something you begin to understand, to learn about, and to treat just like an old friend.

And becoming more comfortable with your career history can give you a shot of confidence now, in your current work situation, and it can help you to guide and steer your career for the future.

You carry your memories with you. They are always accessible, and can be pulled up practically at will. So why not use them?